2. Methods

2. Methods

➜ 2.1 Equipment List

Figure 1.1           Figure 1.2

1. SSID (Super SID Receiver) x1, as shown in Figure 1.1
2. Antenna (D.I.Y.) x1, To be inserted into the Radio Receiver.
3. Knife x1, To help in the process of cutting out the wooden structure for our antenna.
4. Computer x1, To install the software for the Radio Receiver. Provided by Mr Tan.
➪ Computer must have at least a Windows operating system
5. Insulated wire (121m), For antenna to pick up signal.
6. Coax Cable RG-58 of sufficient length, To attach your antenna to your computer.
➪ The length of the cable must be sufficient to stretch from the Radio to the computer in the room.
7. Wooden Sticks x3 To be used for the structure of the antenna.
8. BNC Connector x1, As shown in Figure 1.2 above on the top right.
9. Terminal Connectors x4, As shown in Figure 1.2 above on the left.
10. Terminal Block x1, As shown in Figure 1.2 above on the bottom right.


➜ 2.2 Diagrams of experimental setup  
Screen Shot 2016-02-24 at 1.55.25 pm.png
Figure 1.3

➜ Figure 1.3: Diagram of where to place Radio Receiver and Antenna, which is at Engineering Lab, Second Floor, Block C. The Radio Receiver will be on the left side of the teacher’s table and the antenna will be placed next to the side cabinet.

➜ 2.3 Procedures

1. Set up the experiment as shown in the diagram above (Figure 1.3) at the fifth floor, at S2-03.
2. Insert the already built D.I.Y. Antenna into the SSID Radio Receiver.
3. Plug the Super SID cable into the audio input port in the computer.
4. Plug in the Super SID Power Transformer.
5. Install the Super SID Software (supersid_v1_1.exe), configure it and test it.
6. Turn on the Super SID Radio Receiver.
7. Record the data (signal strength of Solar Flare) as measured by the Super SID Radio Receiver.
8. Record the data over the three day and night cycles of around 9 hour intervals to get six data sets. (A day night cycle is two data sets, according to Mr Tan)

Days at Time
(5.00pm 23 Feb. Start: 26 Feb 4.30pm)
1)
24 Feb
8am to 3pm
2)
25 Feb, 4pm
to
26 Feb, 8am
3)
24 Feb
8am to 12pm
4)
1 Mar, 8am
to
2 Mar, 8am
5)
2 Mar, 8am
to
3 Mar, 8am
Highest Strength of signal recorded





Class of Solar Flare






Figure 1.4

9. Tabulate the information and put it into a table (Figure 1.4). Arrange the information by the time and day the data was recorded.
10. Compare our data with Link 0, Link 1  and Link 2 to see which spikes in our data are Solar Flares.
11. Analyze recordings in the table by seeing the occurrence of signals on each day.

➜ 2.4 Risk Assessment and Management  

Risk
Assessment
Management
The antenna might drop on us.
Medium
Do not push or pull the antenna structure to prevent it from falling on us and it might eventually break.
There might be risk of electrocution.
Medium
Do not modify and touch the electric components even though the radio receivers are designed to be relatively safe.
People might injure themselves from tripping over the wire.
High
Do keep the wire clear of areas where people use to walk to prevent them from tripping over it.
There is a risk of injury when using the screwdriver or crimping tools.
Medium
Do not use a lot of force for certain tools as if the tool slips, it might poke or injure our hands.


➜ 2.5 Data Analysis

Days at Time
(5.00pm 23 Feb. Start: 26 Feb 4.30pm)
1)
24 Feb
8am-
3pm
2)
25 Feb
4pm-
26feb
8am
3)
26 Feb
8am-
12pm
4)
1 March
8am-
2 March
8am
5)
2 March
8am-
3 March
8am
Highest Strength of normal signal (arbitrary unit)
760
150
210
180
190
Class of Solar Flare
C1.4
B
(almost C)
C1
B
(Ordinary emission)
B
(Ordinary emission)

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